Hollywoodland


In 1923 the first steam shovels moved along the slopes of the Hollywood Hills. The project: A subdivision of the 500-acre Sherman & Clark Ranch atop Beachwood Drive. The development was to be known as "Hollywoodland" and was announced in the Los Angeles Times as "one of the most attractive residential sections of the City of Los Angeles". The real estate syndicate comprised of General M. H. Sherman (founder of West Hollywood), Harry Chandler (Publisher of the LA Times) and developer Sidney H. Woodruff. Their grand vision for Hollywoodland was to develop a Mediterranean Riviera in the Hollywood Hills, situated between Griffith Park and Lake Hollywood. With the Architecture and landscaping drawing its inspiration from the southern regions of France, Italy and Spain. Hollywoodland was marketed to wealthy winter visitors to Los Angeles from the East Coat. New Englanders could select their hillside lot and their architectural style, then find their new home waiting for them the following season, fully built and landscaped by the developers. Hollywoodland enjoyed fame in the 1920s as a successful development and America's first themed residential community. Much of the attention and press coverage was due to a huge sign reading "Hollywoodland" which crowned Beachwood Canyon. Known today as "The Hollywood Sign" and recognized as one of the world's best known landmarks, the sign was originally erected as a temporary advertisement for our development. In 1923 the original Hollywoodland sign was built of sheet metal and telephone poles at a cost of $21,000. The sign was covered with 4,000 flashing electric light bulbs which could be seen as far as Long Beach harbor in the Los Angeles night sky. For a time, the future of the Hollywood sign wasn't so bright. In 1932 actress Peg Entwhistle, despondent over her lackluster career, jumped to her death from the 50 foot tall letter "H" of the sign. In 1939 maintenance of the sign ended and the neglected sign fell into disrepair. By 1949 with many of the letters falling down the hillside, the city of Los Angeles decided to raze the sign completely. Public outcry and affection for the sign saved it, and with the last 4 letters removed, it became known as the "Hollywood sign". In 1978 the second restoration of the sign began, led by prominent celebrities and city officials. Surviving a devastating wildfire in 1961, followed by massive mudslides the following year, Hollywoodland today remains one of Los Angeles' most popular neighborhoods. Beyond being the birthplace of the Hollywood sign, Hollywoodland is known for its hamlet -like charm, recreational activities and historical significance. Throughout its 80 -year history, artists, actors, writers and others have all called it home, along with wildlife of deer, foxes, coyotes and native plant life such as blue agaves and chaparral. Some of America's foremost architects: John Delario (the chef designer of Hollywoodland), Richard Neutra and John Lautner, have designed homes in our hills and commercial buildings in our village, many of which have been placed on the City of Los Angeles' Cultural Affairs Department list of Historical and cultural monuments. In 2003, the Hollywoodland Homeowners Association and its residents celebrated the 80th anniversary of  the neighborhood. A similar development was the Outpost Estates.

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Construction of Hollywoodland's sales office and village
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Entrance to Hollywoodland village
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Hollywoodland village at left
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Publicity photo of the early development of Hollywoodland.
HollywoodlandConstruction of Hollywoodland's sales office and village
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Early 1923
HollywoodlandEntrance to Hollywoodland village
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Early 1923
HollywoodlandHollywoodland village at left
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Early 1923
HollywoodlandPublicity photo of the early development of Hollywoodland.
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1923
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Publicity photo during the early development of Hollywoodland
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Publicity photo of the early development of Hollywoodland
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Businessmen at Hollywoodland
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Tour bus at Hollywoodland
HollywoodlandPublicity photo during the early development of Hollywoodland
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1923
HollywoodlandPublicity photo of the early development of Hollywoodland
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1923
HollywoodlandBusinessmen at Hollywoodland
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1923
HollywoodlandTour bus at Hollywoodland
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1923
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Tour bus at Hollywoodland
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Construction of Hollywoodland
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Hollywoodland real estate bus
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HOLLYWOODLAND
HollywoodlandTour bus at Hollywoodland
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1923
HollywoodlandConstruction of Hollywoodland
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1923
HollywoodlandHollywoodland real estate bus
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1923
HollywoodlandHOLLYWOODLAND
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1923