Hollywood History Pre-1900


Hollywood History Pre-1900 One of the first inhabitants of what we now call Hollywood, were the, now extinct, Gabrielino Indians. When the Spanish expedition came through Los Angeles in 1769, they found Gabrielino Indians living in small villages near what is now Hollywood. This land of rolling hills and gentle slopes was known by these early inhabitants as Cahuengna (little hills). Their Chief was Cauegnie. Later these names were rendered in Spanish , Cahuenga and Chief Cahuenga. Their principal village was situated at the mouth of the canyon at the north end of, what is today, Sycamore Avenue, near Highland Avenue. Later, this area became know at Cahuenga Valley and the pass that lay between the Cahuenga Valley and what is now the San Fernando Valley, was known as the Cahuenga Pass. With the invasion of the Spanish in the 1770s, the Cahuenga Valley, and the rest of California, became the possession of Spain. Up to that point, the land now known as California belong to Mexico. On September 27, 1821, Mexico formally declared her independence from Spain. Three years later, when a colonization law passed which authorized the Mexican government to make land grants to heads of families, foreigners, many of them Americans, began to acquire holdings in California. Rancho La Brea The westerly half of what is now Hollywood, was part of Rancho La Brea (Spanish for “The Tar Ranch”). On April 8, 1928, Rancho La Brea, embracing 4,439 acres, was provisionally granted to Antonio Rocha and Nemisio Dominguez . The first permanent resident of the Ranch was James Thompson, later a Los Angeles County Sheriff. Thompson obtained a five-year lease on half of the Rancho in 1852 and built an adobe house and corrals in its northwest quarter. The house still stands today in the middle of the Farmers Market at Fairfax Ave. and Third Street. Farming After numerous title transfers, the rancho eventually ended up in the hands of John and Henry Hancock, and John’s portion became a large part of West Hollywood. By the 1870s, the Cahuenga Valley was being settled by people who wanted to establish farms and orchards. Mr. John Gower, with his wife and five children, came from the Hawaiian Islands and acquired a 160 acre tract between, what is now, Sunset Blvd. and Melrose Ave and Bronson and Gower Streets, at a price of $1.25 per acre. The Gowers began farming and by 1975, they had 400 acres sowed in wheat and Barley. Ten years after the Gowers made the Cahuenga Valley their home, Mr. J, B. Rapp took up forty acres north and south of Franklin Avenue and Beachwood Drive, where he raised pineapples, dates, tomatoes, beans oranges, lemons, avocados, ahd cherimoyas. Like Mr. Gower, Mr. Rapp became involved in community affairs which included acting as a Trustee of the Pass School. In 1870, Mr. michael Sullivan homesteaded the land between Melrose Avenue and Sunset Blvd., west of Vermont Blvd. This is where Los Angeles City College is now located. M. Remi Nadeau, a French sheepman, who later built the Nadeau Hotel in Los Angeles, grazed his sheep on 1000 acres, mostly on the Lick Tract, near Los Feliz Boulevard and Edgemont Street. Henry Hancock and his wife, Ida, built a small frame house in a grove of eucalyptus, pepper and palm trees near the brea beds at the southern portion of the rancho. As mentioned earlier the Cahuenga Valley was used chiefly for framing and grazing cattle. Climate, soil, topography and water supply were favorable to the production of fine crops. The fact that the northern portion of the valley was in a frostless belt, made possible the raising of sub-tropical fruits and winter vegetables without the fear of frost damage. The first farmers came to the valley in the 1870s and began settling on land some distance south of the hills near Santa Monica Blvd., then know as Foothill Blvd. They chose this land because the soil of that section was considered better than the land nearer the mountains. For a long time, the land north of Sunset Blvd. was considered useless, except for grazing sheep. In 1877, Mr. Jacob Miller purchased one half of a sheep ranch near the foothills east of Laurel Canyon. The land proved to be very fertile and abundantly rewarded the new owner handsomely. Since Los Angeles, with a population of 11,000, did not furnish a sufficient demand for crops, the Cahuenga Winter Vegetable Association was organized to develop markets in San Francisco and in other nearby states. The vegetables were taken by wagon to Redondo and sent to San Francisco where there was a demand for vegetables. More and more people began to establish farms and ranches in the Cahuenga Valley. These people, in an informal way, established a community working their own land and exchanging work with their neighbors. Their one-room schoolhouse was four miles to the south and the nearest post office was in Los Angeles. Rancho Los Feliz When Los Angeles was founded by the Spanish in 1781, someone was needed to keep order. Jose Vincente Feliz, a corporal of the guard at the San Diego Presido, was given special powers and sent north for the task. Feliz was an able administrator, and soon he was named “comisionado” of the fledgling pueblo, an office he held until the end of the century when civil officials took over from the soldiers. Feliz retired from the service of the King of Spain and was issued a grant to Ranch Los Feliz, a tract of nearly 7000 acres, from what is now Gower Street on the west, to the Los Angeles River on the east, and from the top of the hills on the north to the Los Angeles pueblo limits on the south. The rancho went through many owners for the next twenty years, until a large portion came into the hands of Griffith J. Griffith, in 1882. Parts of the rancho to the west and south became fine residential sections under Griffith’s ownership, but thousands of acres remained wilderness. Griffith offered 3015 wilderness acres to the City of Los Angeles in 1896 as a gesture of gratitude for his prosperity. The acreage was to be used as a public park, now known as Griffith Park. City officials accepted a deed two years later. The Greek Theater was built in the park in 1930 and the Griffith Park Observatory opened to the public in 1935. Camels And Desperadoes Stories concerning human conditions in the Cahuenga Valley are myriad and Fascinating as those of any area of the settling of the west. The unusual settlers are the ones whose stories are known; one of the most colorful was a man named George Caramambo, known as Greek George. Greek George drew considerable attention by arriving in the Cahuenga Valley with a drove of camels. He had purchased them in the Turkish Gulf of Izmir and brought them to California as part of the United States War Department experiment to open a wagon road from Fort Defiance, New Mexico, ti Fort Tejon, California. But the Civil War interrupted the experiment and it was abandoned. The camels were turned loose and roamed free in what today is Hollywood and in other parts of the Cahuenga Valley. Occasionally, a camel or two would be rounded and raced against horses in the fiestas at the tiny pueblo at Los Angeles. Apparently, the camels didn’t multiply in numbers sufficient to survive, and all trace of them was gone by the turn of the century. Greek George remained in California and became a naturalized citizen in 1867, choosing the name George Allen. The adobe home he built near what is now Kings Road and Santa Monica Blvd. was the setting for yet another colorful incident in the Cahuenga Valley history; the capture of the notorious bandit Tribucio Vasquez. Vasquez was born in Monterey County in 1837. By the age of twenty-one, he was sent to San Quentin prison for horse stealing in Los Angeles. He escaped and was recaptured and served his sentence until 1863. After his release, sit became evident that he hadn’t been rehabilitated, for soon he was leading a band of desperadoes who, among other unsavory activities, killed three men at Tres Pinos and robbed stagecoaches along the Owens River Road. The bandit wasn’t above petty extortion either, and many of the valley’s ranchers were pressed into his aid in return for promised immunity from his desperadoes. Eugene Plummer, a man who eventually purchased Greek George’s adobe house, was requested to buy ten pairs of boots and place them in a cave at the head of the canyon west of Cahuenga Pass Road. Plummer did so, and, in return, found in his corral the three horses that had been stolen from his ranch the week before. In 1874, at San gabriel, Vasquez tied Alexander Reppito to a tree and made him sign a $800 check drawn on the Workman and Temple Bank. He then sent the victim’s young nephew to the bank for the cash, threatening to kill Reppito if the boy failed to return alone with the money. Shortly after the Reppito caper, Sheriff William R. Howland of Los Angeles learned that Vasquez was a “guest” at the adobe of Greek George, about two miles southwest of Cahuenga Pass. At early daylight on May 14, a posse from Los Angeles surrounded Greek George’s house. As several men approached the south dining room door, Greek George’s wife opened the door. Seeing the men, she screamed and tried to slam it shut, but the posse burst in just as Vasquez sprang from the table and leaped through the window. Policeman Emil Harris fired at Vasquez, but missed. At the sound of Harris’ shot, George Beers, a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle, stepped into the path leading along the west side of the house. As Vasquez came flying around the corner, Beers fired, wounding the bandit in the shoulder, while at the same time Police Chief B.F. Hartley gave him a double barreled charge of buckshot. Vasquez threw up his hands in surrender. Greek George was arrested too, but later released. Vasquez was placed in the Los Angeles jail and soon recovered from his wounds. Later he was transferred to San Jose, where he was found guilty of murder and hanged on March 19, 1875. Laughlin Park Not al real estate developmentw were doomed to failure. One that met with success was started in the late 1890s, when Homer Laughlin purchased several acres on a hill just east of Western Avenue and north of Franklin Avenue. He developed into beautiful Laughlin Park, which, with its tropical botanical gardens, bvecame a choice residential subdivision. Years later, Laughlin Park became part of the magnificent Los Feliz residential district. One of Laughlin park’s first residents was Edmund D. Sturdevant, who devoted his land the cultivation of tropical lilies. In his Cahuenga Water Gardens were rare species from South America, Japan and Egypt. The lotus was his favorite, and it flourished in all sizes and tints . Mos impressive to the tourists was his Victoria Regina, whose pads were so large and firm that they were able to support a child, and were so displayed for visitors. Colegrove Another early and successfru development was begun in 1893, when Cornelius Cole subdivided his property, naming it Colegrove in honor of his wife Olive Colegrove Cole was a former senator and had practiced law in Washington D.C., where he had represented the claimants to Rancho La Brea when the title disputes had come before the Supreme Court.. He received one-tenth interest in the rancho in payment for his legal services. The Colegrove development was bounded by Sunset and Beverly Boulevards between Weward and Gower Streets. “Downtown” was Santa Monica Blvd. & Vine St., where a store was built on the northeast corner in 1884. Later a post office was established in the store, to the delight of valley residents who werre weary of the seven-mile ride to Los Angeles. Hollywood was not the only community beginning to grow. There were scored of other Southern California cropping up, including Morocco, in the heart of prersent-day Beverly Hills; Sunset, which preceded Westwood Village; and Sherman, now known as West Hollywood. The Ostrich Farm And Other Railroads The first railroas to lay track in Hollywood was the Los Angeles Ostrich Farm Railroad. The line connected Los Angeles with Dr. C. J. Sketchley’s Ostrich Farm on the Rancho Los Feliz at what is now Griffith Park. Tthe first train ran September 25, 1887. Work began almost immediately on extensions of the line westward to Santa Monica and northward to Burbank. Both were completed by the end of 1888. The first train reached the Santa Monica bluffs on Christmas Day. At about the same time, James McLaughlin incorporated the Cahuenga Valley Railroad, bought Los Angeles’ Second Street Railway, and continued its line west to Wilcox Ave. Tthe line was sold again in 1894, and the new owners planned to extend the tracks to Laurel Canyon. Residents, however, threatened action to prevent it from being built, so the Cahuenga Valley Railroad decided to build it now and worry about it later. On a Friday night, after county offices had closed, precluding the possibility of an injunction, a section crew with flat cars of ties and rails, appeared at the Wilcox Avenue terminus and went to work. By Monday morning the line had passed down Highland Avenue to Sunset Boulevard and was on its way west. The angry property owners could only stare in frustration at the fait accompli. General Moses Sherman, a wealthy Phoenix capitalist, arrived in Los Angeles in 1890 and became interested in the primitive electric railway lines running throughout the city. Within weeks, he purchased control of the rickety Pico Street Electric Railway line, Southern California’s first railroad system. From this beginningm he built, over the next five Years, a network of electric street railway lines in the city under the name Los Angeles Consolidated Electric Railway Company. The general brought his brother-in-law, Eli P. Clark. into the management as an associate, and gradually an effective working partnership evolved, with Clark as the front man and Sherman as the money man. On April 11, 1894, Sherman and Clark incorporated the Pasadena and Los Angeles Electric Railway Company, which instructed the first interuban line, running between Los Angeles and Pasadena. Within seven months, the partnership formed the Pasadena and Pacific Railroad Company for the purpose of acquiring and electrifying the railway lines from Los Angeles th Santa Monica. In the spring of 1896, the Pasadena and Pacific purchased 5.56 acres of land adjoining Santa Monica Boulevard and what is today San Vicente Bouldvard in West Hollywood. They proceeded to build a car barn, a steam powerhouse and a shop on the site. The new facility was named “Sherman” after Pasadena and Pacific’s head man. Shortly thereafter, they began electrifying and modifying the routes of the newly acquired railway lines. When a national depression occurred in 1897 and 1898, the Pasadena and Los Angeles line defaulted on its bond payments. After months of futile reorganization, the line was sold by the court on April 27, 1898. On June 4, 1898, Sherman and Clark, incorporated a new company, the Los Angeles-Pacific Railroad Company, which took over the financially troubled Pasadena and Pacific line. Through several subsequent incorportaionsand mergers evolve the Los Angeles Pacific Railroad, one of the largest and finest electric interurban sustems in the country. Eight years later, the Southern Pacific Railroad, through its president, E.H. Harrimanm came into control of the Los Angeles Pacific Railroad. Although the salve gave more than half of the 150,000 shares of stock to Southern Pacific, Sherman and Clark remained in active contorl for some time. The Ostrich Farm And Other Railroads The first railroas to lay track in Hollywood was the Los Angeles Ostrich Farm Railroad. The line connected Los Angeles with Dr. C. J. Sketchley’s Ostrich Farm on the Rancho Los Feliz at what is now Griffith Park. Tthe first train ran September 25, 1887. Work began almost immediately on extensions of the line westward to Santa Monica and northward to Burbank. Both were completed by the end of 1888. The first train reached the Santa Monica bluffs on Christmas Day. At about the same time, James McLaughlin incorporated the Cahuenga Valley Railroad, bought Los Angeles’ Second Street Railway, and continued its line west to Wilcox Ave. Tthe line was sold again in 1894, and the new owners planned to extend the tracks to Laurel Canyon. Residents, however, threatened action to prevent it from being built, so the Cahuenga Valley Railroad decided to build it now and worry about it later. On a Friday night, after county offices had closed, precluding the possibility of an injunction, a section crew with flat cars of ties and rails, appeared at the Wilcox Avenue terminus and went to work. By Monday morning the line had passed down Highland Avenue to Sunset Boulevard and was on its way west. The angry property owners could only stare in frustration at the fait accompl. General Moses Sherman, a wealthy Phoenix capitalist, arrived in Los Angeles in 1890 and became interested in the primitive electric railway lines running throughout the city. Within weeks, he purchased control of the rickety Pico Street Electric Railway line, Southern California’s first railroad system. From this beginningm he built, over the next five Years, a network of electric street railway lines in the city under the name Los Angeles Consolidated Electric Railway Company. The general brought his brother-in-law, Eli P. Clark. into the management as an associate, and gradually an effective working partnership evolved, with Clark as the front man and Sherman as the money man. On April 11, 1894, Sherman and Clark incorporated the Pasadena and Los Angeles Electric Railway Company, which instructed the first interuban line, running between Los Angeles and Pasadena. Within seven months, the partnership formed the Pasadena and Pacific Railroad Company for the purpose of acquiring and electrifying the railway lines from Los Angeles th Santa Monica. In the spring of 1896, the Pasadena and Pacific purchased 5.56 acres of land adjoining Santa Monica Boulevard and what is today San Vicente Bouldvard in West Hollywood. They proceeded to build a car barn, a steam powerhouse and a shop on the site. The new facility was named “Sherman” after Pasadena and Pacific’s head man. Shortly thereafter, they began electrifying and modifying the routes of the newly acquired railway lines. When a national depression occurred in 1897 and 1898, the Pasadena and Los Angeles line defaulted on its bond payments. After months of futile reorganization, the line was sold by the court on April 27, 1898. On June 4, 1898, Sherman and Clark, incorporated a new company, the Los Angeles-Pacific Railroad Company, which took over the financially troubled Pasadena and Pacific line. Through several subsequent incorportaionsand mergers evolve the Los Angeles Pacific Railroad, one of the largest and finest electric interurban sustems in the country. Eight years later, the Southern Pacific Railroad, through its president, E.H. Harrimanm came into control of the Los Angeles Pacific Railroad. Although the salve gave more than half of the 150,000 shares of stock to Southern Pacific, Sherman and Clark remained in active contorl for some time. Sherman Township The township of Sherman, though not within the geographic boundaries of Hollywood, deserves mentioning, not only because of its close proximity ti Hollywood, but also because it was later renamed West Hollywood. Shortly after the completion of the above mentioned Pasadena and Pacific, “Sherman” railroad facilities at Santa Monica and San Vicente boulevards, a small railroad town, embracing twelve acres and surrounding the railroad buildings, began to take shape. For many years, Sherman was the operating headquarters for the railway company. In addition to all the repairs on the cars and equipment made in the shops, many new cars were built there. As a result, a large number of mechanics of all crafts were required. As the work increased at the railroad facility, so did the number of employees. For several years, Sherman was totally residential, with the exception of the railroad facility and one merchant, L.J. Quint, who, aside from owning Sherman Hall and Store, was the town’s first postmaster. Lots during the early development of Sherman sold for as low as $150, with the terms of $10 down and $19 per month. Shortly after the turn of the century, Sherman and the surrounding vicinity began to be recognized by many as the ideal residential district. At the north, the slopes were being purchased as sites for magnificent homes, while business establishments were beginning to be seen on Santa Monica Boulevard. As the number of residents and merchants increased, so did the size of its geographical boundaries, until it began to border on Hollywood in the early 1920s. Since its founding in 1896, Sherman Township had never been annexed to the City of Los Angeles. Since it was located in the County of Los Angeles, many residents favored joining the city to secure the benefits of municipal water and sewer systems, better street car service, and more adequate fire protection. Others attacked the proposal primarily on the grounds of increased taxes. On January 29, 1924, a closely contested annexation election was held in the county. Voting produced a slim majority of 814 to 750 against annexation. Just prior to the 1920s, the name West Hollywood began to be used in addition to the name Sherman. By 1925, the Town of Sherman was torn with distention over the choice of a formal name. The residents were considering changing the name to Beverly Park or East Beverly or West Hollywood or Magnetic Springs. Though its only speculation, it would appear that a formal name change election may have been held, for it was at about this time that the name West Hollywood was beginning to be used almost exclusively. Today, West Hollywood is its own city and is still within the boundries of the County of Los Angeles. Commerce In Hollywood The first market and general merchandise store in the Cahuenga Valley was started in 1885 by Alfred Watts across the street from the Colegrove Post Office at Santa Monica and Vine. Watts moved his Hollywood Cash Grocery to Sunset and Cahuenga in 1888. He bought the Edgemont Street sore and operated both, delivering goods all over the north side of the valley. His delivery man also picked up the mail on his route and mailed it at the Prospect Park Post Office, until the government stopped him from robbing the Colegrove Post Office of its patronage. Hollywood’s first meat man was Jacob Muller, who, in 1885, came to Los Angeles, where he represented the Mayer Packing House, covering the Hollywood area with simiweekly deliveries. In 189, he bought the home and market site on the north side of Sunset Blvd. at Ivar, where he established the Hollywood Market, which he ran until 1907. He then formed the Union Ice Company in 1914. The four acres Muller had acquired at the southeast corner of Sunset and Ivar later became the site of the largest automotive superservice station in the world. Martin LaBaig established the Six-Mile House at Sunset and Gower in 1887, selling meals, beer, wines and liquor. The same year Horace D. Sackett bought three 65-foot lots at Prospect Ave and Cahuenga Ave. and opened the second general sore and first hotel in the Cahuenga Valley: The Sackett Hotel, a three story building that became the overnight and breakfast spot for visitors from the north, as well as a hangout for the valley’s bachelors. Mr. & Mrs. Rene Blondeau bought six acres at the northwest corner off Sunset and Gower in 1889 and built The Cahuenga House, also known as the Blondeau Tavern. The tavern would become the hone of one of the pioneer film companies (the Nestors Film Company) during the movie invasion of Hollywood twenty two years later. Cooperative Marketing Begins In 1889, increased demand for vegetables and semitropical fruits in Los Angeles and San Francisco caused the Cahuenga Valley growers to unite and form the Farmers’ League of Cahuenga Township. The purpose of the league was to protect its members from ruinous competition by providing ways of disposing of their crops. A survey showed that there were 291 acres of tomatoes, 102 acres of peas, 82 acres of beans, and 20 acres of chilis in the north section of the valley. Six years later, in 1895, the valley’s lemon growers formed the Cahuenga Valley Lemon Growers’ Exchange to operate a packing house where the lemons could be graded for uniform size and quality, and to begin shipments to eastern markets. 1n 1897, a large packing plant was built at Santa Monica Boulevard and Cahuenga Avenue. The associations name was changed to the Cahuenga Valley Lemon Association, and the next twenty years, lemons were shipped nationwide under the names Blue Ribbon, Punch Bowl, and Club, and for local consumption under the brand name of Valley. Early Churches Hollywood’s first house of worship, the German Methodist Church, was built in 1876 by the Reverend George Schultz, a Methodist, with volunteer labor on donated land at Santa Monica Blvd. and Kingsley Dr., two blocks east of the present Hollywood Freeway. The second church society in the Cahuenga Valley was the Hollywood Christian Church, started in 1888 by the Reverend M.L. Yager. By 1891, it had forty one members. That was the same year that Harvey Wilcox died, and his widow, one of Yegar’s parishioners, donated to the church a small lot at the corner of Cahuenga and Selma. Three years later, a small church that seated 150 was built. As Hollywood grew, the church grew with it, and eventually the present structure was built at Hollywood Blvd. and Gramercy Avenue. Several years later, the church formed a union with the Beverly Christian Church and assumed the name of Hollywood - Beverly Christian Church. Other citizens met a year after the Hollywood Christian Church was founded to form the First Methodist Episcopal Church South, and in 1890, they built their church at Fairfax Ave. and Santa Monica Blvd. This was later moved to Cahuenga and Selma on land given by the ecumenical Mrs. Wilcox, and moved again in 1904 to the southeast corner of Prospect and Vine. The Catholic population of the Cahuenga Valley was forced to travel seven miles to attend mass in downtown Los Angeles until 1903, when Blessed Sacrament Church was formed. Services were held in Drouet’s Hall at Sunset Blvd. and Cahuenga Ave., until a church could be built and a parish school were moved to 6657 Sunset Blvd. The First Schools The closest school to the Cahuenga Valley throughout most of the 1880s was the one-room Cienega School, four miles overland without roads at Pico Boulevard and La Brea Avenue. The Cahuenga School district was formed in 1876, and a schoolhouse was built at the corner of Normandie Avenue and Beverly Boulevard. It too, ahd become inadequate by 1881, and the district was divided again to form the Pass School District. While a three-room school was under construction, on the south side of Sunset near Gordon Street, classes sere held in the home of William Beesemyer. They wee taught wy Mary Gower, daughter of John and Mary Gower who had arrived from Hawaii twelve years earlier. The Laurel School District built a one-room schoolhouse in 1886 in West Hollywood, and a year later the Los Feliz School District was organized and a two-room school with a tower was built at the northwest corner of Los Feliz Boulevard and Vermont Avenue. A few years later the student body moved to a new school at Hollywood Boulevard and New Hampshire Avenue. Following a fire in 1914, which all but destroyed the school, new building were constructed. After the 1932 earthquake rendered the school buildings unsafe, they were torn down and replaced with new modern structures. The First Newspapers The first newspaper in the Cahuenga Valley, the monthly Cahuenga Suburban appeared in April 1895. It was profusely illustrated with photographs and printed on book paper and was owned and edited by Seymour J. Millikin. The Suburban ceased publication in 1899 and the following year the weekly Cahuenga Valley Sentinel was started by A.A. Byron and his son, Fred. The name was changed to the Hollywood Sentinel within a few months. The Sentinel was the only newspaper for five years, then several citizens headed by Dr. E. O. Palmer obtained $1230 in subscriptions from forty eight residents and began the Hollywood Citizen, which appeared on April 2, 1905. The two papers, with a combined circulation of 800, were merged in 1911, with the Hollywood Citizen name surviving. The paper was sold later the same year to Harlan G. Palmer. An Artist Comes To the Cahuenga Valley In 1899, French born Paul DeLongpre arrived in Los Angeles with his wife, Josephine, and three daughters, Alice, Blanche and Pauline. A painter since the age of twelve, Delongpre had exhibited his oils and watercolors in Paris and New York before making his way west. DeLongpre loved to wander through the suburbs of Los Angeles on a bicycle, searching for floral subjects for his paintings. He often visited the Cahuenga Valley, now called Hollywood, where he found congenial French conversation with the Blondeau family. Soon he gave an exhibition in Los Angeles, where he met Mrs. Daeida Wilcox Beveridge, to whom he expressed his desire to build a home and studio in the Cahuenga Valley. In 1901, he bought from Mrs. Beveridge three 65-foot lots facing east on Cahuenga Ave. north of the corner lot north of Prospect Ave. In 1902, having found his garden too small, he bought the corner lot for $3000, in lieu of which Mrs. Beveridge accepted three paintings. Besides his worldwide reputation as a floral artist, DeLongpre was a man of great person al charm and sincerity. His palatial home, studio, and guest house with their profuse, veriegated, perennial floral setting, made his home one of the most prized showplaces in Southern California. His studio always contained fifty or more finished watercolors of flowers. While only a few tourist visited the Cahuenga Valley before the turn of the century, now literally thousands flocked each year to see the famous artist and his floral haven.

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Looking at Los Feliz
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Blessed Sacrament Church
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Methodist Episcopal Church
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The Cahuenga Pass
Hollywood History Pre-1900Looking at Los Feliz
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1937
Hollywood History Pre-1900Blessed Sacrament Church
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1907
Hollywood History Pre-1900Methodist Episcopal Church
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1905
Hollywood History Pre-1900The Cahuenga Pass
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1896
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Looking south in the Cahuenga Pass
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J.P. Rapp's pineapple field in the Cahuenga Valley
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Orange Grove in the Cahuenga Valley
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Orange grove on Krotona Hill in the Cahuenga Valley.
Hollywood History Pre-1900Looking south in the Cahuenga Pass
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1899
Hollywood History Pre-1900J.P. Rapp's pineapple field in the Cahuenga Valley
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1882
Hollywood History Pre-1900Orange Grove in the Cahuenga Valley
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1885
Hollywood History Pre-1900Orange grove on Krotona Hill in the Cahuenga Valley.
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1893
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Griffith Park Observatory
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Sackett Hotel at Hollywood Blvd. & Cahuenga Ave.
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Colegrove Store at Santa Monica Blvd. & Vine St.
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C.J Sketchly's Ostrich Farm near Griffith Park
Hollywood History Pre-1900Griffith Park Observatory
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1935
Hollywood History Pre-1900Sackett Hotel at Hollywood Blvd. & Cahuenga Ave.
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1901
Hollywood History Pre-1900Colegrove Store at Santa Monica Blvd. & Vine St.
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1888
Hollywood History Pre-1900C.J Sketchly's Ostrich Farm near Griffith Park
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1889