Runyon Canyon/The Pines


In 1867, "Greek George" Caralambo, aka Allen, received the 160-acre  parcel by federal patent in appreciation for his service in the U.S. Army Camel Corps. Allen became famous by association when the bandit Tiburcio Vasquez was captured while hiding out at his home in 1874


Alfredo Solano, a prominent civil engineer and civic leader, purchased the canyon a year after Vasquez was hanged in 1876. Solano held the canyon as an investment before his widow, Ella Brooks Solano, sold the majority of the land to Carmen Runyon in 1919. Runyon, having recently retired from a successful coal business in the East, came out with his new bride to enjoy the California climate. The marriage failed and Runyon moved to Hollywood where he met and married Ellen Hunt. The new Mrs. Runyon was an accomplished horsewoman and the Runyons purchased the canyon to use for riding and hunting. They built a small bungalow near the Fuller Avenue entrance.


Runyon lent his name to the canyon, the road and Carman Crest Drive before he sold the estate in 1930 to John MacCormack the world-famed Irish tenor. McCormack had fallen in love with the estate whilst filming "Song O' My Heart" there in 1929. The film was an early "talkie" and McCormack's salary for the picture went to purchase the property and build the mansion he called "San Patrizio", after Saint Patrick. It was one of the most beautiful residences in the Hollywood hills. He and his wife lived in the mansion until they returned to England in 1938. Remains of terraced gardens and buildings can still be seen below the Vista gates.


McCormack toured frequently and in his absence the mansion was often rented out to many celebrities. The McCormacks made many friends in Hollywood, including his neighbor, Chares E. Toberman. After his farewell tour of America in 1937, the McCormacks deeded the estate back to Carman Runyon, expecting to return at a later date. World War II intervened, however, and, McCormack's health was broken by a wartime concert tour. McCormack died in 1945. In the meantime, Huntington Hartford, heir to the A&P Grocery fortune and patron of the arts, purchased the property in 1942, moving into the mansion and renaming the estate "The Pines". 


In 1964, Hartford offered the property to the City of Los Angeles, but the city would not accept the gift.. He then sold the property to Jules Berman who demolished the mansion and all the out buildings. Other residential areas included the Hancock Park/Windsor Square and Fremont Place

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John McCormack & Huntington Hartford;s home in Runyon Canyon. Known as
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Entrance gate to Huntington Hartford's
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Entrance gates to Huntington's,
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Looking at the back of the entrance gates to
Runyon Canyon/The PinesJohn McCormack & Huntington Hartford;s home in Runyon Canyon. Known as "The Pines"
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1954
Runyon Canyon/The PinesEntrance gate to Huntington Hartford's "The Pines" in Runyon Canyon
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1973
Runyon Canyon/The PinesEntrance gates to Huntington's, "The Pines", in Runyon Canyon.
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1973
Runyon Canyon/The PinesLooking at the back of the entrance gates to "The Pines", in Runyon Canyon
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1973
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Burned out ruins of a house in
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Burned out ruins of house in
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Burned out ruins of house in
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Abandoned tennis court at Huntington Hartford's
Runyon Canyon/The PinesBurned out ruins of a house in "The Pines. Occupied by Errol Flynn in 1958 when he appeared in a play at the Huntington Hartford Theater.
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1973
Runyon Canyon/The PinesBurned out ruins of house in "The Pines". Once occupied by Errol Flynn when he appeared in a play at the Huntington Hartford Theater
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1973
Runyon Canyon/The PinesBurned out ruins of house in "The Pines". Once occupied by Errol Flynn when he appeared in a play at the Huntington Hartford Theater
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1973
Runyon Canyon/The PinesAbandoned tennis court at Huntington Hartford's "The Pines" in Runyon Canyon.
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1973
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Pergola on Huntington Hartford's
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Pool house & pool, designed by Frank Wright, located in Runyon Canyon, was owned by Huntington Hartford.
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Interior of the pool house, designed by Frank Wright, located in Runyon Canyon, was owned by Huntington Hartford.
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Pool house & pool, designed by Frank Wright, located in Runyon Canyon, was owned by Huntington Hartford.
Runyon Canyon/The PinesPergola on Huntington Hartford's "The Pines" in Runyon Canyon
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1973
Runyon Canyon/The PinesPool house & pool, designed by Frank Wright, located in Runyon Canyon, was owned by Huntington Hartford.
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1960s
Runyon Canyon/The PinesInterior of the pool house, designed by Frank Wright, located in Runyon Canyon, was owned by Huntington Hartford.
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1960s
Runyon Canyon/The PinesPool house & pool, designed by Frank Wright, located in Runyon Canyon, was owned by Huntington Hartford.
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1960s