Hotels & Apartments


Some of California’s finest hotels were located in and around Hollywood.


The Ambassador Hotel began operation formally on January 1, 1921, and was located at 3400 Wilshire Blvd., between Catalina Street and Mariposa Avenue, in the center of the Los Angeles miracle mile district. Designed by Pasadena architect Myron Hunt the Ambassador Hotel was frequented by celebrities, with some residing there. From 1930 to 1943, six Academy Award ceremonies were held at the hotel. Seven U.S. Presidents stayed at The Ambassador Hotel, from Hoover to  Nixon, along with chiefs of state from around the world. For decades, the hotel's famed Cocoanut Grove nightclub hosted well-known entertainers, such as Nat King Cole, Barbara Streisand, Judy Garland and Sammy Davis Jr.. In the pantry area of the hotel's main kitchen, soon after midnight on June 5, 1968, and after a  victory speech in the Embassy Room ballroom, presidential candidate, Senator Robert Kennedy was shot along with five other people.  In 2005, the hotel closed it’s doors.


The Beverly Hills Hotel was opened on May 12, 1912, before there was even a city called Beverly Hills, by Margaret J. Anderson and her son, Stanley S. Anderson. The famous hotel is located on Sunset Blvd. By 1914, Beverly Hills had attracted enough residents to incorporate as a city.


The original building of hotel was designed by Pasadena architect Elmer Grey in the Mediterranean style. Twenty-three separate bungalows are located  on the property. The extensive gar dens of the grounds are one of the features of the hotel. The popularity with royalty and celebrities continued to escalate over the years. Guests included the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, Liz Taylor, John Wayne and Henry Fonda.  father had an art gallery in the hotel’s lower level. Howard Hughes lived at the hotel on and off for 30 years.The demand for high-quality housing in Hollywood resulted in a  number of prestigious apartment towers being erected.  One of these was the Garden Court Apartments in Hollywood Boulevard, just east of La Brea Ave.  Built in 1919, the magnificent structure of Renaissance design boasted of thick Oriental carpets, baby grand pianos, and fine oil paintings in every apartment. During its  heyday, many notable celebrities  including Louis B. Mayer, Mack Sennett and Mae Murray called the Garden Court home.  After being one of Hollywood’s most prestigious buildings in Hollywood, it was town down in the 1980s.


During the 1920s Hollywood was a rapidly growing town and to accommodate all the incoming folks numerous apartment hotels started to spring up. One of those hotels was the Hollywood Plaza Hotel, built in 1925, located at 1637 North Vine Street just south of Hollywood Boulevard.


In the 1940s and 1950s when many broadcast studios were located on or near Vine Street.  The hotel became popular with radio people. In 1937, the silent film actress Clara Bow opened a nightclub adjacent to the Plaza, named the "It Cafe" in reference to her popular film "It." By this time Bow was not the big star she used to be and the opening of the club was an attempt to revive her career. Bow managed the place with her husband Rex Bell and at the opening, promised to be in attendance 3 times a week. However, after the birth of her second child Bow gained weight and lost interest in the club. 


The first hotel in Hollywood was the Sackett Hotel. In 1887, Mr. Horace D. Sackett bought three lots at Hollywood Boulevard and Cahuenga Avenue, and opened Hollywood’s second general store and the first hotel in the Cahuenga Valley. The Sackett Hotel, a three story building that became the overnight and breakfast stop for visitors from the north, as well as a hangout for the Valley’s bachelors. 


In 1908, Lookout Mountain, just east of Laurel Canyon, was subdivided into bungalow  lots, most of which had panoramic views of the city. The winding road to the top of the mountain was widened in 1910 and the Lookout Mountain Inn was built.  The inn consisted of twenty-four rooms, a bandstand, and a pavilion.  Diners, who enjoyed the inn’s chicken dinner specialty, had an unobstructed 270 degree view of Los Angeles – worth the forty-five minute drive up the steep grade in their underpowered automobiles.  The Lookout Mountain Inn was destroyed by fire in 1918.


Other Hollywood hotel photographs, on the hollywoodphotographs.com  web site are of the Garden of Allah, Hollywood Hotel and the Roosevelt Hotel.

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Ambassador Hotel under construction
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Ambassador Hotel under construction
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Ambassador Hotel under construction
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Ambassador Hotel under construction
Hotels & ApartmentsAmbassador Hotel under construction
HA-001-1
1923
Hotels & ApartmentsAmbassador Hotel under construction
HA-001-2
1923
Hotels & ApartmentsAmbassador Hotel under construction
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1923
Hotels & ApartmentsAmbassador Hotel under construction
HA-001-4
1923
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Ambassador Hotel just after construction completion.
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Beverly Hills Hotel
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Beverly Hills Hotel
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Beverly Hills Hotel
Hotels & ApartmentsAmbassador Hotel just after construction completion.
HA-001-5
1924
Hotels & ApartmentsBeverly Hills Hotel
HA-002-1
1921
Hotels & ApartmentsBeverly Hills Hotel
HA-002-2
1922
Hotels & ApartmentsBeverly Hills Hotel
HA-002-4
1912
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Chateau Elysee on Franklin Ave.
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Chateau Elysee on Franklin Ave.
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Chateau Elysee on Franklin Ave.
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Christie Hotel on Hollywood Blvd.
Hotels & ApartmentsChateau Elysee on Franklin Ave.
HA-004-2
1963
Hotels & ApartmentsChateau Elysee on Franklin Ave.
HA-004-3
1971
Hotels & ApartmentsChateau Elysee on Franklin Ave.
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1971
Hotels & ApartmentsChristie Hotel on Hollywood Blvd.
HA-005-1
1925