Radio & TV


Radio Los Angeles is the second biggest radio market in the country, behind New York City. Over 50 stations populate the radio dial. KROQ, one of the last standing alternative stations in the nation, helped pioneer the format that industry experts said could not be done. A consistent market leader in the 2000s has been contemporary hits trend-setter KIIS (102.7). The station's morning personality, Ryan Seacrest, rose to national celebrity status in 2002 when he became a co-host of the top television series American Idol. Seacrest had done afternoons at Star 98.7 (KYSR) from 1995 to 2003 and then became host of the syndicated radio countdown American Top 40. He replaced Rick Dees as KIIS morning host in Febuary 2004. Rick Dees returned to L.A. radio in the fall of 2006 on Movin 93.9, after Emmis flipped long time country station KZLA to KMVN, playing a mix of urban, disco and dance classic hits. Many times what has started in L.A. has been followed by the nation. It was true in the sixties when KHJ became the market leader with top 40 hit music. The consulting team of Bill Drake and Gene Chenault was the key behind KHJ's success beginning in the mid-sixties. They consulted other major market stations after KHJ quickly rose to number one in the market with its fast-paced energetic approach to delivering the hits. "Boss Radio" became the seed of what top 40 radio was through the eighties. When 93 KHJ had its final number one ratings book in 1976 the jock line-up included Charlie Van Dyke, Mark Elliott, Bobby Ocean, M.G. Kelly, Dave Sebastian Williams, Beau Weaver and John Leader (johnleader.com). KHJ had a sister station, KHJ-FM (101.1), which had been on the air since August 1941. It was the first FM station in Los Angeles. Throughout much of the AM's heyday, the FM was a simulcast of the AM. Then in 1973 the FM started doing its own programming as an oldies station (K-Earth), in which the call letters changed to KRTH. Radio changed dramatically in the seventies. Many listeners were moving to FM, checking out progressive rock stations like KLOS (95.5) and KMET (94.7). KLOS, which was KABC until 1970, began experimenting with underground rock in 1969. KMET, owned by Metromedia, signed on in 1968 as "The Mighty Met" under the programming of Tom Donahue, who had moved his staff in April 1968 from KPPC (106.7), which had actually been the first freeform station in the market. KPPC had been the original home of Dr. Demento, who moved to KMET in 1970. KPPC remained underground until 1971, then eventually evolved into KROQ-FM. By the eighties FM had completely taken over as far as music stations, with KIIS (102.7) being the leader in top 40, although KPWR (Power 106) did take the lead at the end of the decade. KIIS had previously been KRHM until 1971 when it became a top 40 station as KKDJ. The station was purchased by Combined Communications, who changed the call letters to KIIS. For awhile it was an adult contemporary station but changed back to top 40 in 1981. KPWR had previously been KMGG until January 11, 1986 when it became a dance leaning hit station. In the nineties it went hip hop. KMET evolved into an album rock format, which it dropped February 14, 1987 in favor of new age as KWTV (The Wave). A year earlier, a new classic rock station was born with KLSX (97.1). In July 1991 it began airing the Howard Stern show. In 1995 the format shifted to all talk radio as "Real Talk 97.1" featuring people like Susan Olsen (from the Brady Bunch) and Kato Kaelin. KLOS became the home of syndicated radio show Mark and Brian. The station that stole the rock crown in Los Angeles was the one elevated by Rick Carroll, and that was KROQ. It gradually evolved from the early seventies to the late seventies as a mix of album rock and alternative music. Carroll's arrival in the late seventies triggered a more mainstream approach to cutting edge rock music. KROQ has now been the leader for many years in the Los Angeles area rock scene. Commercial radio started in 1920 in Pittsburgh, PA with the airing of the Presidential Election returns. Within the next few years licenses were granted by the U.S. Commerce Department for commercial radio operators. During the first decade of commercial radio, many stations changed owners and frequencies often. Here's what the Los Angeles radio dial looked like in 1922: In the forties four big national networks dominated the radio industry. The network affiliations were KECA (790 AM, ABC), KFI (640 AM, NBC), KNX (1070 AM, CBS) and KHJ (930 AM, Mutual-Don Lee). All four stations began in the first decade of commercial radio, the 1920s. KFI and KHJ were among the earliest licensees in 1922. KHJ's call letters originally stood for "kindness, happiness and joy." After several years of frequent changes on the dial due partly to FCC regulations, Los Angeles AM radio began to take a more consistent shape in the the early forties. Other stations besides the big network affiliates included KMTR (570), KIEV (870), KFWB (980), KFVD (1020), KPAS (1110 AM), KFSG (1230), KPPC (1240) and KFAC (1330). Long Beach stations KFOX (1280) and KGER (1390) could also be heard in the Los Angeles area. Los Angeles was an early testing ground for FM stations in the late 1930s. Some of the early FMs included KNX, which was owned by CBS and KGFJ, owned by Ben S. McGlashan. Both stations operated at low power. In 1941 the Don Lee System was granted an a frequency at 99.7 FM, marking the birth of KHJ-FM, which was the sister station to the popular AM station. Later in the decade it moved to 101.1 FM. The FM dial in 1948 also included KUSC (91.5), KNX-FM (93.1), KECA-FM (95.5), KRKD (96.3), KKLA (97.1), KMPC (100.3), KFAC-FM (104.3), KCLI (105.1) and KFI-FM (105.9). Within the next ten years the FM dial went through a complete makeover. In the fifties rock and roll radio was born and became a determining factor in the industry shift from block (multi-format) programming to formats based on demographics. While MOR (middle of the road) stations emerged to captivate adults with classic pop music mixed with a lot of announcer commentary, rock and roll stations attracted younger audiences. Despite the emergence of television in the fifties, radio did not die. In fact, the advent of the transistor radio made radio more affordable and popular with teens - the baby boomers. Today, some of the radio and TV towers are located behind the Hollywood Sign. Other similar photographs are on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and Gilmore Field categories.

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ABC TV Center on Prospect Ave
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KCEA-ABC TV on Vine St.
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KECA-ABC TV on Vine St.
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KECA-ABC TV on Vine St.
Radio & TVABC TV Center on Prospect Ave
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1971
Radio & TVKCEA-ABC TV on Vine St.
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1953
Radio & TVKECA-ABC TV on Vine St.
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1953
Radio & TVKECA-ABC TV on Vine St.
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1953
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KECA-ABC TV on Vine St.
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ABC TV on Vine St.
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CBS Radio Playhouse on Vine St.
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CBS Radio Playhouse on Vine St. George Raft, June Lang, Gloria Swanson & C.B. DeMille
Radio & TVKECA-ABC TV on Vine St.
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1950
Radio & TVABC TV on Vine St.
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Radio & TVCBS Radio Playhouse on Vine St.
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1936
Radio & TVCBS Radio Playhouse on Vine St. George Raft, June Lang, Gloria Swanson & C.B. DeMille
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1936
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CBS RADIO PLAYHOUSE
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CBS Radio Playhouse on Vine St.
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CBS Radio on Sunset Blvd.
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George Burns & Gracie Allen at CBS Radio on Sunset Blvd.
Radio & TVCBS RADIO PLAYHOUSE
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1938
Radio & TVCBS Radio Playhouse on Vine St.
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1938
Radio & TVCBS Radio on Sunset Blvd.
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1943
Radio & TVGeorge Burns & Gracie Allen at CBS Radio on Sunset Blvd.
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1938