Restaurants/ Nightclubs


HOLLYWOOD'S FAMOUS "SUNSET STRIP" RESTAURANTS AND NIGHTCLUBS Most, if not all, of Hollywood's famous restaurants and nightclubs are now simply pages in history. However, in their day, they were the "most talked about", "most written about" and most popular eateries and night spots in the world. No place had the number of handsome and beautiful stars and celebrities as Hollywood. And did they like to eat and be seen frolicking in such lavish and plush surroundings. The Sunset Strip portion of Sunset Blvd. was the location of some of the most notable restaurants and nightclubs that Hollywood had to offer. Not actually located within the geographic boundaries of Hollywood, the Sunset Strip was a mile-and-a-half stretch of Sunset Blvd. that passes through, what is now, West Hollywood. It was given it name because it was a strip of land that was not part of Los Angeles City but was part of Los Angeles County. CAFE TROCADERO The Cafe Trocadero was the first in a long line of famous restaurants on the Sunset Strip. William "Billy" Wilkerson was the founder of one of Hollywood's motion picture trade papers, The Hollywood Reporter. In 1933, he opened a gourmet speciality store and restaurant called The Vendome at 6666 Sunset Blvd. The restaurant was known primarily as a lunch eatery and was patronized by such stars Joan Crawford, The Gables, Mae West, Louella Parsons and Marlene Dietrich. Looking for a place where he could promote evening dining and dancing, Wilkerson leased the defunct La Boheme restaurant, on Sunset Blvd. and took to remodeling the building. After months of remodeling and decorating, the place was ready for business. The grand opening was held on September 17, 1934, with such celebrities as Carl Laemmle Jr., Ida Lupino, George Raft and the Daryl Zanucks in attendance. Commonly known as the "Troc" it became the place to be seen and to rub elbows with countless other celebrities. Wilkerson started a Sunday night audition, where "wannabes" would get up on stage to perform in front of this stars who had already "made it". Parties were one of the Cafe Trocadero's most talked about events. When a star threw a party, whether it be for a birthday or someone's anniversary, it was the talk of the town and every celebrity wanted to be invited. Premiere and charity event parties were also held at the Troc and the press was always there to write about it. Jean Harlow as a fairly regular patron until her tragic death in 1937. In late 1937 or early 1938, Wilkerson pulled out of Cafe Trocadero to start another restaurant, called Ciro's, just down the street. Shortly thereafter, Cafe Trocadero began to lose its luster. With competition looming on the horizon, the famous restaurant closed its doors on October 7, 1939. CIRO'S Started in 1941 by William "Billy" Wilkerson, founder of The Vendome and Cafe Trocadero, it was an immediate success and became the most popular nightclub on the Sunset Strip. The stars of Hollywood flocked to the new nightclub in droves. Because of Wilkerson's success with the Cafe Trocadero, his loyal followers followed him to Ciro's. Some of Hollywood's most popular celebrities were "regulars", including Clark Gable, Charlie Chaplin, Paulette Goddard, Errol Flynn, Lucille Ball, Dezi Arnez, John Payne, Olivia DeHavilland, Ginger Rogers, Ronald Reagan and many, many others. Many stars, such as Lana Turner, called Ciro's her favorite haunt. Soon, Ciro's was "packing them in" and the audience was entertained by some of Hollywood's best singers and comedians. Celebrities, such as Sophie Tucker, Maurice Chevalier and Danny Kaye performed to a packed house, every time they appeared at Ciro's After two and a half years, Billy Wilkerson pulled out of Ciro's and went down the street to establish La Rue Restaurant. In his place, Herman Hover took over the reins and continued to enhance the nightclub's great reputation. Under his management, it continued to be one of Hollywood's hot-spots. He remodeled the place to make it one of the most lavish and largest nightclubs on the Sunset Strip. The club continued to cater to Hollywood's elite by providing the best of entertainment in Hollywood. Headliners like Jerry Lewis, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis Jr., Peggie Lee, Liberace and may others continued to entertain Ciro's most loyal customers. With the increasing popularity of the Las Vegas shows, Hollywood's nightclubs found it impossible to compete with the enormous salaries paid entertainers by the gambling capitol of the world. After more than fifteen years of entertaining Hollywood's Who's Who, Ciro's went out of business in January, 1958. LA RUE RESTAURANT In the fifties, there were two reasons to eat a La Rue: the food was considered to be among the city's finest, and you might get a mention in the Hollywood Reporter, one of the industry's trade journals. William "Billy" Wilkerson sold his interest in the Trocadero in 1938 and opened Ciro's nearby in 1940. Before he sold out, in 1946, rival clubs were opening On Sunset Blvd, such as Mocambo and the Earl Carroll Theater. In the early forties, Wilkerson opened the elegant La Rue restaurant with Bruno Petoletti and Chef Orlando Figini, who opened and managed the Italian Pavilion at the 1939 World's Fair in New York. Petoletti was maitre d' at the Pavilion and of the Pump Room in Chicago. Figini went on to become the chef at the Waldorf Astoria and "21" in Manhattan. Figini was a chef at Ciro's and the Arrowhead Hotel, another of Wilkerson's investments. The three men joined forces to create the very French La Rue on a visible corner of what is now Sunset Plaza. Stars sat in rich gold leather booths, as opposed to the more prosaic red ones found in other establishments. The red-carpeted main dining room was dominated by two huge crystal chandeliers, which were so elaborate that the proprietors had to regularly summon crystal cleaning specialists from San Francisco. La Rue, said to be Jack Warner's favorite restaurant and a regular destination for Walt Disney, at 8361 Sunset Blvd., was just one of the city's finest restaurants. Wilkerson, who owned the Hollywood Reporter, kept vigil there at table No. 1 and freely plugged the stellar goings-on in his paper. La Rue was the favorite of many of Hollywood's rich and famous including Clark Gable, Marilyn Monroe, Montgomery Clift, Sophia Loren and countless other stars. Figini and Petoletti bought Wilkerson's interest in 1950 and the restaurant closed in 1969. MOCAMBO The Mocambo nightclub was located at 8588 Sunset Boulevard, was founded in 1940 by Felix Young and ex-agent, Charles "Charlie" Morrison. The world-renowned club became one of the favorite "club" of member of the movie colony. Stars such as Clark Gable, Carole Lombard, Norma Shearer, Robert Taylor, Rita Bayworth, Barbara Stanwick, Rosalind Russell, Henry Fonda, James Stewart, Errol Flynn, Victor Mature, Lana Turner and Reginald Gardiner were regular patrons who gathered there to enjoy the company of other personalities. The glamorous Mocambo, with its black and white wallpaper and its unusual decor, had an aviary of live birds that lived in ornate cages in the club. In order to show the passersby who was performing at the nightclub, Morrison installed a neon lighted marque above the front entrance on the Sunset Strip. Dancing was provided by the club's own orchestra, which at times, was conducted by Paul Hebert and Eddie Oliver. In addition to the regular orchestra, Harold Stein and his Strolling Violins played for the customers. Charlie Morrison, who was always at the club greeting his guests, approached the booking of entertainment with a Barnum-like flair. As a result, the club boasted of having some of the top performers, such as Edith Piaf, Eartha, Kitt, Dinah Shore, Bob Hope, Jack Benny, Billy Daniels and Lena Horne, entertain the "Who's Who" of the entertainment world. According to Hollywood legend, Marilyn Monroe persuaded the owners of the all-white club to book Ella Fitzgerald in the mid- 1950s &emdash; and her performance changed Fitzgerald's career. She became the first black performer at the Mocambo. After leaving the Tommy Dorsey orchestra in 1943, Frank Sinatra made his Los Angeles debut as a solo act at the club. When Charlie Morrison first saw Earth Kitt perform, he was ecstatic. "The Gal's wonderful," he declared. "I'll book her into the Mocambo any time she's free." She performed there several times. The club's main stage was replicated on the television series "I Love Lucy" as the "Tropicana" Club. Both Lucille Ball and Dezi Arnez were frequent guests at the Mocambo and were close friends of Charlie Morrison. Sunday evening was talent night. Marilyn Morrison, Charlie's daughter, interviewed the talent during the day and selected those who would perform that evening. In 1952, Marilyn married the popular crooner, Johnnie Ray, but they later divorced. The Mocambo continued to operate for a short time after Charlie Morrison's death, but it just wasn't the same. Finally, much to the bereavement of its many notable patrons, the famous club closed its doors on June 30, 1952. THE PLAYERS Preston Sturges was a celebrated playwright, screenwriter and film director who took screwball comedy format of the 1930s to a new level, writing dialogue that, heard today, is often mature and ahead of it time, despite the farcical situations. Sturges liked to work and eat late, wanted a place to go that was open whenever his friends were hungry. In 1938, while under contract to Paramount, he bankrolled Snyder's. a short-lived restaurant run by Ted Snyder. When Snyder's failed to catch on, Sturges closed it down and tried to sell the kitchen supplies and equipment he now owned. Unable to recoup his losses by more than a few cents, he decided to open a restaurant himself. Sturges didn't think small. To house "The Players", named for the New York theatrical club, he found a two story house-turned-wedding chapel on the Sunset Strip, at 8225 Sunset Blvd. If nothing else, it was well situated, just down the street form the Chateau Marmont Hotel and almost across the street from the famous, or infamous, Garden of Allah Hotel. After transforming the structure into a tri-level entertainment complex with a supper club and a revolving orchestra stage, it was ready for business. Opened in 1940, The Player was extremely popular from the start, and continued to be throughout the war years. Regulars included Barbara Stanwick, Charles Chaplin, Humphrey Bogart, Rudy Vallee and Joel MacCrea who stared in two of Sturges' films. Sturges himself held court there nightly. Inside the dimly lit rooms, he held cast parties for his movies and courted the women in his life. It was here that Sturges meet his fourth wife, Anne Margret Nagle who lived up on the hill behind The Players. The following year, she married him on the Playroom stage. Howard Hughes frequently dined at The Players, sometimes alone. sometimes with a starlet and sometimes with Sturges. The two became fast friends and dined together quite a bit. During their many dinners, they came up with the idea for California Pictures Corporation, which turned out to be a disastrous collaboration. At his peak, Sturges was one of the highest paid men in America but he had no feel for business. His continual insistence of treating his pals didn't help matters. Sturges liked good food, and he hired several French chefs tp cook sophisticated fare such as hot cheese canape appetizers, Turkey croquettes with supreme sauce and meringues glace. The Players, a bottomless pit for Sturges' earnings continually recorded losses. Finally, in 1953, his creditors put The Players up for sale. The location later became the gathering place for the Friers Club and the site for tow other restaurants, Imperial Gardens and Roxbury. COCK 'N BULL In 1937, shortly after Hollywood's reigning king and queen, Douglas Fairbanks and Mary Pickford, put the finishing touches on their exquisite Tudor style Pickfair estate, in Beverly Hills' Benedict Canyon, the Cock 'n Bull a small cozy pub, opened down the hill at 9170 Sunset Blvd. For the next 50 years, the Cock 'n Bull, with its print of Old London over the bar and coat of arms stamped china, remained one of the city's most popular watering holes. In the forties, a cocktail invented here called the Moscow Mule became the Cock ' Bull's signature. "The Drink With The Velvet Kick" as a sign over the bar promised, was a brew of vodka, and the establishment's own brand of English ginger beer served in a splendid, iced copper mug. Errol Flynn, F. Scot Fitzgerald, Sinclair Lewis and Somerset Maugham would sit for hours at the bar, which was always populated with an assortment of Hollywood agents and deal makers. A big American buffet was another attraction, featuring a plethora of turkey, mashed potatoes and, of course, roast beef and Yorkshire pudding. During World War II, large portions of prime rib were reportedly served and relished here in spite of meat rationing. To start off a meal, many patrons would order the Welshman's Rabbit, a specialty of the house. After fifty years of serving great drinks and wholesome food, the Cock 'n Bull closed in 1987. SCANDIA Another famous Sunset Strip eatery was Scandia, located at 9131 Sunset Blvd, just east of Doheny Drive. Kenneth Hansen and his sister, Teddy, natives of Copenhagen, opened Scandia in 1946. Although Teddy was a working co-owner until her death in 1979, Kenneth was always the star and ran the place with an iron fist. In the early years, he cooked the kind of simple Germanic , brasserie food that was familiar to Hollywood's ethnic population. Peter Lorre, who had worked in theater in Switzerland and Germany, lunched at Scandia every Saturday. Hansen was man's man who inaugurated an all-male drinking and eating club called The Vikings of Scandia, whose members were stars and businessmen. Everett Crosby, Bing's brother and manager, was the first Viking chief. In 1957, the Hansens moved across the street to 9040 Sunset Blvd. As the Viking membership grew, stars such as Cornel Wilde, Marilyn Monroe, Gary Cooper, Ingrid Bergman, Marlene Dietrich, Rosalind Russell and Rita Hayworth discovered the restaurant's gracious service and distinctive cuisine. The restaurant's reputation grew and so did its clientele. It wasn't uncommon to see many of Hollywood's stars dining on the great food. Hansen became more sophisticated and traveled back to Scandinavia to bring new recipes back to Hollywood. In its prime, Scandia was considered the finest Scandinavian restaurant in the country and seafood was flown in year round from the north Atlantic. In 1978, the Hansens sold Scandia to Marge and Robert Peterson, publishers of such magazines as "Teen", "Hot Rod", "Motor Trend" and many others. Hansen stayed on as a consultant until his death. The restaurant closed its doors in 1987 HOLLYWOOD'S OTHER FAMOUS RESTAURANTS MUSSO AND FRANK GRILL Musso and Frank Grill got it's beginning when Firmin "Frank" Toulet opened Frank's Cafe on September 27, 1919, at 6669 Hollywood Blvd. The name was later changed to Frank's Francois Cafe. Two other restauranteurs, Joseph Musso and Joseph Carissimi had restaurants/cafes in Portland, Oregon and Sacramento, California. After moving to Los Angeles, Joseph Musso entered into a partnership with Frank Toulet and changed the name from Frank's Francois Cafe to Musso and Frank Grill in 1923. Four years later, Frank sold his interest to John Musso and Joseph Carissimi. In the 1930s, the restaurant expanded and moved its front door to 6667 Hollywood Blvd. Sometime in the 1950s, the restaurant took over Stanley Rose's Bookstore and remodeled it to create the New Room which housed bar and more seating. Quite a few of the staff members have been with Musso and Frank Grill for many years. Jean Rue, Musso's most tenured and famous chef, created the menu that exists today. He was with the restaurant from 1922 until 1976. The most famous head waiter at Musso and Frank was Jesse Chavez, who worked for over 50 years, beginning in the 1920's. Jesse started as a dishwasher and moved up to baker, pantry man, busboy, waiter and finally headwaiter. In the 1970's he became one third owner for a brief time. He ran a tight ship and roamed the restaurant putting out fires as he saw fit. Beginning in the 1930s, almost everyone in the entertainment business dined or drank at Musso and Frank. Through the years, waiters served Mary Pickford, Greta Garbo, Edward G. Robinson, Claudette Colbert, Bette Davis, Cesar Romero and many more. The restaurant was also known for it's clientele of famous writers including William Saroyan, John Fante, Scott Fitzgerald, Nathaniel West, William Falkner, Thomas Wolfe, Ernest Hemingway and many more. The restaurant was also popular with members of Hollywood's business community. One such businessman was Charles E. Toberman, who was Hollywood's most successful real estate developer. Among his many buildings were Grauman's Chinese Theater, Grauman's Egyptian Theater, El Capitan Theater, the Hollywood Bowl and the Outpost Estates. He had his wife, Josephine, ate out almost every night and Musso and Frank was one of their favorite eateries. Their grandson, Bruce Torrence who authored "Hollywood: The First 100 Years", was also a frequent patron of "Musso's" Today, Musso and Frank Grill is still the most popular restaurant in Hollywood. Over the course of the last thirty years, almost all of the fine dining restaurants, in Hollywood, have gone our of business. Due to its consistently good food and excellent service, Musso and Frank Grill has weathered the choppy economic seas that Hollywood has experienced. DON THE BEACHCOMBER RESTAURANT The story of Don the Beachcomber began shortly after Prohibition. A small town Minnesota schoolteacher with a big imagine named Cora Irene Sound saved enough money so that she could move to Los Angeles and secure a job as a waitress at the Tick Tock Tear Room, a family owned restaurant. Cora soon met an inventive bartender, Ernest Raymond Beaumont-Gantt, who served exotic rum drinks in his tacky tropical bar located in the Hollywood Hotel. His moniker was 'Don The Beachcomber'. When the schoolteacher and bartender mated, Hollywood's first tropical restaurant was born. Cora Irene (a.k.a. 'Sunny Sound' and 'Mama C.I.') borrowed money and opened Don's Beachcomber Cafe, in 1934, at 1722 N. McCadden Pl., in Hollywood. To give the effect of tropical rain, Ernest would go out with a garden hose and sprinkle water on the corrugated too and awnings. Needing better quarters, they moved the restaurant across the street to 1727 N. Mc Cadden Pl., in 1937. At this time, Cora had become the company's president and Ernest's wife. Ganett changed his name several times, using Donn-Beach-Comber, to Donn Beachcomber, and finally settling on Donn Beach. At their new restaurant, the couple created their own Hollywood influenced, romantic notion of a tropical paradise, a real conceit restaurant, complete with artificial rainstorms designed to romantically pitter patter down the corrugated roof. Filmland potentates have always had a soft spot for hidden spots, and Don The Beachcomber was just that. From the outside, the place, surrounded by a forest of bamboo, was hard to find, save for a small sign that was intentionally made difficult to read - the underlying message being that if you didn't know where it was, you didn't belong. But inside,, for L.A.'s first South Sea eatery, the schoolteacher and bartender let the collective fantasies run wild. It was twenty years ahead of Disneyland, and Hollywood's royalty, including the Marx Brothers, Franchot Tone, Bing Crosby, Marlene Dietrich, and Greer Garson basked in its folly. Frequent patrons were Charles E. Toberman, his wife, Josephine and his many grandchildren. The proof was in the chopsticks that were enshrined in a glass case. Small dining rooms, which bore names like the 'Black Hole of Calcutta' and the 'Cannibal Room' were decorated with palm trees, bananas, coconuts, sea shells, shark's jaws, headdresses and carved wooden gods. AAt one point, the restaurant included a Chinese grocery store, rum shop, gift shop and lei shop. The island-shaped dining tables were made of varnished woods, and more than a few glamorous creatures received proposals of one sort or another in the provocative, candle-illuminated rooms. Certainly helping things along weere Don's intoxicating rum drinks. Missionary's Downfall, Vicious Virgin, Cobra's Fang and the notorious Zombie. Don's rum concoctions were so ingenious they even impressed drinkers like 'Trader' Vis Bergeron. While Don handled the bar part of the business, Cora Irene hired Chinese cooks to create a South Seas-Cantonese hybrid cuisine that was way beyond the chop sue and chow mien found on the menus of most Chinese restaurants of the day. Dishes were made with then-uncommon ingredients like water chestnuts, bamboo shoots, lichee nuts and oyster sauce imported from China. The schoolteacher and bartender succeeded in business but failed in their relationship. They divorced in 1940 but continued to work together, opening Beachcombers in Palm Springs and Chicago. In 1958, Joe Drown, owner of L.A.'s Glamorous Bel-Air Hotel, took over the company with businessman David Price and opened more Beachcombers in Marina Del Rey, Newport Beach. A decade later, J. Ronald Getty, son of J. Paul, bought the chain. In 1985, the original Don The Beachcomber restaurant closed and was demolished in 1987. Don The Beachcomber photos can be seen on hollywoodphotographs.com. It is the largest collection of Hollywood photographs and all can be view on this web site. Please email Bruce Torrence at myoldphotos@me.com if you have any questions. ROMANOFF'S To an industry driven by fantasy and imaginary, Romanoff's was a perfect fit. The Beverly Hills Restaurant was the name sake and invention of a self-declared prince with a personality big enough to dazzle the town's most important movers and shakers. Competing studio heads, Daryl Zanuck and Jack Warner were among those who put up the money fro Romanoff's in Beverly Hills, and "Prince" Mile Romanoff became a celebrity. Romanoff was born Hershel Geguzin in Lithuania in 1890 and immigrated to New York City at age ten and changed his name to Harry F. Gerguson sometime after 1900. His father was a tailor and Harry became a pants presser. At some point, he claimed to be Prince Michael Dimitri Alexandrovich Obolensky-Romanoff, nephew of Tsar Nicholas II. The fact was, no one cared whether or not Romanoff was Prince Romanoff or Grand Duke Michael Romanoff or Harry Gerguson, the son of a tailor, which apparently he was. His ancestry was merely irrelevant. When He arrived in Hollywood in 1927, the always dapper Prince Romanoff - known for his trademark spats, moustache and walking stick - lived in hotels, borrowed money from his wealthy pals and charmed everyone in sight. He even spoke with a genuine Oxford accents - although it was believed he acquired it working a servant in the lofty British university. Still, there was always room for Romanoff on a Hollywood polo team because he was the kind of a guy the movie crowd loved having around. In 1931, a member of the Russian guard branded him a fake, and since he had not citizenship papers or passport to dispute the charge, Romanoff disappeared for a decade. In 1941, he resurfaced, opening the first Romanoff's at 326 N. Rodeo Dr., in Beverly Hills. By 1945, Life Magazine crowned him "the most wonderful liar in 20th-century US," a description that only seemed to further his restaurant's success. The place was so popular that its only problem was appeasing the celebrities, who all felt deserving of one of the "A" booths across from the bar. As it was, at lunchtime the first booth was always occupied by Humphrey Bogart, the second by William Morris agent Abe Lastfogel, the third by Louis B. Mayer, the fourth by Darryl Zanuck and the fifth by Harry Cohn. So in 1951, Romanoff moved to larger quarters down the street at 240 S. Rodeo Drive, where there was a roof garden, ballroom for private parties, a small private dining room and a much larger dining room designed to accommodate 24 equally-desirable booths. It didn't quite work out that way &emdash; people only wanted to be seated on the left of the staircase as they entered, and there were only four booths on that side of the room. Unfortunately, if twelve V.I.P.'s showed up - including say, Clark Gable, Lana Turner and Cole Porter - Romanoff was forced to seat someone in Siberia. Although business at the new location prospered through the late fifties, after that it became increasingly difficult to fill the room. When all the booths weren't booked, the restaurant, which was starkly decorated and brightly lit (with neither flowers nor candlelight to soften it) looked particularly barren. But then there was increasing competition from newer restaurants in town, and much of Romanoff's clientele was aging into the old guard. For all Romanoff's charm, he could also offend. One lunchtime he made disparaging remarks about Alfred Hitchcock who appeared to be napping after consuming a large meal. Hitchcock, however, heard every word and never returned. To stimulate reservations, Romanoff introduced black-tie dinner dances on Thursday nights - maids' night off" in Beverly Hills. But his political associations doomed him. He became ultra Republican in a community of Democrats, and actually began to distribute political literature on the tables. Compounding this problem was a financial blunder - opening the disastrous Romanoff's on the Rocks restaurant in Palm Springs. In 1958, Romanoff achieved his goal of becoming a U.S. citizen by an act of Congress signed by President Eisenhower. Romanoff's closed its doors on New Year's Eve, 1962. Mike Romanoff died of a heart attack on September 1, 1971 MOULIN ROUGE HOLLYWOOD For five years after Earl Carroll's untimely death in 1948, the Earl Carroll Theater was operated by various promoters trying vainly to make it a success. It wasn't until Frank Sennes took it over in 1953, that it became the center of night life gaiety in Hollywood. An extensive remodeling campaign was undertaken which included expanding the seating capacity to 1250, making it the largest theater-restaurant in the world. After months of construction, booking the various acts, hiring the dances, designing and making the costumes, and developing a production, Frank Sennes' Moulin Rouge opened its doors on the 25th of December, 1953. From the beginning, Sennes was dedicated to the policy of providing the finest stage entertainment available. During the seven years of its illustrious existence, the Moulin Rouge presented countless outstanding personalities such as Peggy Lee, Ella Fitzgerald, Billy Daniels, Dean Martin, Dennis Day, the Mills Brothers, Anna Marie Alberghitti, Frankie Laine, Johnny Ray, and Mister Showman himself, Liberace. In addition to the star headliners, the show assembled more than 100 beautiful singers and dancers who paraded around the large stage in costumes costing in excess of $75,000. The success which the Moulin Rouge experienced was due, in part, to what Sennes called the "package deal." For just $5.50, the customer received a complete full course deluxe dinner, danced to a fine orchestra and watched top entertainers perform. Sundays were devoted to the family matinee, which featured a kiddie circus, complete with clowns, balloons and toys. Beginning in 1955, he daytime show "Queen For A Day', starring Jack Bailey, was broadcast from the Moulin Rouge. By the late fifties, Sennes found it moor and more difficult to attract top-name entertainers because of his inability to compete with the high salaries being paid by Las Vegas. Recognizing the enormous potential and opportunity that Las Vegas had to offer, he closed the Moulin Rouge, in 1960, and began producing shows in the gambling capital of the United States. Two of the most famous restaurants in Hollywood were the Brown Derby and the Coconut Grove.

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Abruzzi Restaurant on Sunset Blvd.
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Alfie's Restaurant on Sunset Blvd.
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Au Petit Cafe on Vine St.
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Au Petit Cafe on Vine St.
Restaurants/ NightclubsAbruzzi Restaurant on Sunset Blvd.
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1973
Restaurants/ NightclubsAlfie's Restaurant on Sunset Blvd.
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1973
Restaurants/ NightclubsAu Petit Cafe on Vine St.
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1979
Restaurants/ NightclubsAu Petit Cafe on Vine St.
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1979
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Armstrong Carlton Cafe on Hollywood Blvd.
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Barkies Sandwich Shop in Hollywood
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Barney's Beanery at 8447 Santa Monica Blvd.
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Biltmore Bowl at the Biltmore Hotel
Restaurants/ NightclubsArmstrong Carlton Cafe on Hollywood Blvd.
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1923
Restaurants/ NightclubsBarkies Sandwich Shop in Hollywood
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1928
Restaurants/ NightclubsBarney's Beanery at 8447 Santa Monica Blvd.
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1949
Restaurants/ NightclubsBiltmore Bowl at the Biltmore Hotel
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1930
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Biltmore Bowl at the Biltmore Hotel
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Bit of Sweden Restaurant on Sunset Blvd.
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Bob's Big Boy on Vine St.
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Bob's Big Boy on Vine St.
Restaurants/ NightclubsBiltmore Bowl at the Biltmore Hotel
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1933
Restaurants/ NightclubsBit of Sweden Restaurant on Sunset Blvd.
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1940
Restaurants/ NightclubsBob's Big Boy on Vine St.
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1973
Restaurants/ NightclubsBob's Big Boy on Vine St.
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1973