Gilmore Stadium


Gilmore was a multi-purpose facility in Hollywood. It was opened in May 1934 and demolished in 1952, when the land was used to build a television station called CBS Television City. The stadium held 18,000. It was located next to Gilmore Field. The stadium was located west of Curson Avenue, surrounded by Beverly Boulevard, Fairfax Avenue and Third Street. The stadium was built by Earl Gilmore, son of Arthur F. Gilmore and president of A. F. Gilmore Oil, a California-based petroleum company which was developed after Arthur struck oil on the family property. It was used for American Football matches at both the professional and collegiate level. The stadium was the home of the Los Angeles Bulldogs, the first professional football team in Los Angeles. The Bulldogs competed as an independent team before joining the second American Football League in 1937 and winning its championship with a perfect 8-0-0 record, the first professional football team to win its championship with an unblemished record. After the collapse of the league, the Bulldogs returned to being an independent team before joining the American Professional Football Association in 1939. The Bulldogs then became charter members of the Pacific Coast Professional Football League in 1940 and played in Gilmore Stadium until 1948, when the team moved to Long Beach, California, for its (and the league's) final season. Extra seating was added to accommodate 21,000 fans for the Pro Bowl for the 1940 NFL season. The crowd set a record as the largest to view a Los Angeles pro game. The event was held on December 29, 1940. The game pitted the 1940 NFL Champion Chicago Bears against an All-Star team from the other NFL clubs in the third NFL All-Star game. The Bears won 28 to 14 The Hollywood Stars baseball team of the Pacific Coast League played here for a time, while awaiting completion of Gilmore Field's construction. Midget car racing was invented at the track. The track hosted midget car racing from the track's debut in May 1934 to 1950. The 1939 Turkey Night Grand Prix was held at the track. Roger Ward drove Vic Edelbrock's midget car in a famous August 10, 1950 event at Gilmore Stadium. Ward shocked the racing world by breaking Offenhauser engine's winning streak by sweeping the events at Gilmore Stadium that night. In the sixteen years of the stadium's existence, over 5 million fans attended races at the track. The stadium drew crowds over 18,000 people each race.[7] Attendance dropped to below 9,000 at normal weekly races by the late 1940s. The attendance drop and increased demand for property in West Hollywood led to the track's sale in 1950. It was torn down in 1951. Some of its grandstand was installed at Saugus Speedway. It also hosted donkey baseball, dog shows, rodeos, and at least one cricket match. Esther Williams performed in a diving and water ballet performance. A temporary above ground pool was constructed for the event. Several professional boxing title matches where held in the stadium. U.S. President Harry S. Truman delivered his "stiff upper lip" speech in the stadium. The stadiun was next door to Farmers Market and the Pan Pacific Auditorium.

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Gilmore Stadium
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Gilmore Stadium
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GILMORE STADIUM
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Gilmore Stadium
Gilmore StadiumGilmore Stadium
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1938
Gilmore StadiumGilmore Stadium
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1938
Gilmore StadiumGILMORE STADIUM
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1947
Gilmore StadiumGilmore Stadium
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1950
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Gilmore Stadium Billboard
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Gilmore Stadium
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Gilmore Stadium
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Gilmore Stadium
Gilmore StadiumGilmore Stadium Billboard
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1938
Gilmore StadiumGilmore Stadium
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1950
Gilmore StadiumGilmore Stadium
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1950
Gilmore StadiumGilmore Stadium
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1950
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Aerial photo of Gilmore Stadium & Farmers' Market
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Aerial of Gilmore Stadium
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Gilmore Stadum
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Aerial photo of Gilmore Stadium
Gilmore StadiumAerial photo of Gilmore Stadium & Farmers' Market
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1938
Gilmore StadiumAerial of Gilmore Stadium
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1938
Gilmore StadiumGilmore Stadum
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1938
Gilmore StadiumAerial photo of Gilmore Stadium
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1935