Hancock Park/Windsor Square


California roughly bounded by Van Ness Avenue to the East, Melrose Ave. to the North, La Brea Ave. to the West, and Wilshire Boulevard to the South. Hancock Park was developed in the 1920s, by the Hancock family, with profits earned from oil drilling in the former Rancho La Brea. Hancock Park owes its name to developer-philanthropist George Allen Hancock, who subdivided the property in the 1920s. Hancock, born and raised in a home at what is now the La Brea Tar Pits inherited 4,400 acres, which his father, Major Henry Hancock had acquired from the Rancho La Brea property owned by the family of Jose Jorge Rocha. Some 71 oil wells were operating at capacity on the land from 1905 to 1910. Nine years later Hancock subdivided the property into residential lots. He leased 105 acres to the Wilshire Country Club with an option to buy. The Hancock Park development was started on Rossmore Avenue and moved west to Highland Avenue in 1921. Architects such as Paul Williams, A. C. Chisholm and John Austin were hired to design homes for many of the city's pioneer families. The list of families who moved into Hancock Park's first homes reads like a "Who's Who" of California: Doheny, Chandler, Huntington, Van Nuys, Crocker, Banning, Newmark, Van de Kamp and Duque, were some of the early residents. Hancock Park consists of R-1 single family units located north of Wilshire Boulevard and south of Melrose Avenue. Along its western and eastern boundaries, North Highland Avenue and North Rossmore Avenue, houses along both sides of the street are within Hancock Park.In sharp contrast to most Los Angeles neighborhoods, houses in Hancock Park are set well back from the street, most power and telephone lines are buried, and fences are strongly discouraged. The area also surrounds the Wilshire Country Club alongside which the Academy Award winning Actress Kathy Bates (Misery, Titanic, About Schmidt) lives in her $4.5 million dollar mansion not too far from the Los Angeles Tennis Club. These characteristics, along with the area's abundance of classic Los Angeles architecture, have made it one of the most desirable areas in all of Southern California ever since its development, and the average household income of its residents consistently ranks among the highest in the United States Windsor Square is a small, historic and wealthy urban neighborhood in the Mod-Wilshire region of Los Angeles, California. Sometime between 1900 and 1910 a gentleman named George A.G. Howard envisioned a beautiful tranquil park as a setting for family homes such as one sees in the English countryside. He pushed the early city fathers to make his vision come true, and in 1911, Mr. Robert A. Rowan initiated a unique residential development and called it Windsor Square. The original "Square" ran from Wilshire Blvd. to Third St. and from Plymouth Blvd. to Irving Blvd. The English flavor was enhanced by street names: Irving, Windsor and Plymouth. Lorraine Boulevard took its name from the developer's daughter Lorraine Rowan. Nurseryman Paul J. Howard designed and planted most of the magnificent gardens of Windsor Square and supervised tree planting. Windsor Square was later expanded to the north, east, and west. Today, Windsor Square runs from Wilshire to Beverly Boulevards, and from Arden Boulevard to Van Ness Avenue. This is inclusive of the one-block strip of Larchmont Village, between First Street and Beverly Boulevard. Windsor Square is often mistakenly called "Hancock Park," even by long-time residents. But in fact, Hancock Park is the neighborhood immediately to the west. Windsor Square's homes have the same historic value as in Hancock Park, but most of the homes are built on a slightly smaller scale. Windsor Square consists of approximately 1,100 homes, and it is one of the oldest, most well preserved neighborhoods in Los Angeles. With its broad lawns, mature trees and central location five miles west of downtown, Windsor Square is a garden oasis in the heart of a world-class city. Windsor Square contains Larchmont, a "main street" for Windsor Square, which is particularly popular with teenagers and young adults. The Marlbourgh School For Girls, just three streets over from Larchmont and on Rossmore Avenue, is one of the most prestigious all-girls schools in Los Angeles. Windsor Square is served by the Larchmont Chronicle monthly community newspaper. Windsor Square is also home to Getty House, the official residence of the Mayor of Los Angeles.

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Looking north from southerly boundary of Fremont Place. The street from left to right is Wilshire Blvd. The street to the right of the thin vertical black line (in the center) is Rossmore Ave.
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Looking NE at Windsor Square
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Windsor Square at 5th St. & Lucerne St.
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Windsor Square houses at 4th St. & Lucerne St.
Hancock Park/Windsor SquareLooking north from southerly boundary of Fremont Place. The street from left to right is Wilshire Blvd. The street to the right of the thin vertical black line (in the center) is Rossmore Ave.
AER-1924-11
1924
Hancock Park/Windsor SquareLooking NE at Windsor Square
HPWS-001
1920
Hancock Park/Windsor SquareWindsor Square at 5th St. & Lucerne St.
HPWS-002
1921
Hancock Park/Windsor SquareWindsor Square houses at 4th St. & Lucerne St.
HPWS-003
1921
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Looking north at Hancock Park
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Looking NW at Hancock Park
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Looking NW at Hancock Park
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Looking NE at Hancock Park
Hancock Park/Windsor SquareLooking north at Hancock Park
HPWS-004
1924
Hancock Park/Windsor SquareLooking NW at Hancock Park
HPWS-005
1924
Hancock Park/Windsor SquareLooking NW at Hancock Park
HPWS-006
1924
Hancock Park/Windsor SquareLooking NE at Hancock Park
HPWS-007
1924